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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of brief review of selected aspects of the San Blas Cuna Indians found in the catalog.

brief review of selected aspects of the San Blas Cuna Indians

Aubrey E. Lippincott

brief review of selected aspects of the San Blas Cuna Indians

by Aubrey E. Lippincott

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  • 27 Currently reading

Published by American University, Counterinsurgency Information Analysis Center in Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cuna Indians.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementcompiled by Aubrey E. Lippincott and Hartley F. Dame.
    ContributionsDame, Hartley F., joint author., American University, Washington, D.C. Counterinsurgency Information Analysis Center.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsF1565.2.C8 L56
    The Physical Object
    Pagination50 l.
    Number of Pages50
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5085538M
    LC Control Number74156719

    The Alta California missions, known as reductions (reducciones) or congregations (congregaciones), were settlements founded by the Spanish colonizers of the New World with the purpose of totally assimilating indigenous populations into European culture and the Catholic religion. It was a doctrine established in , which based the Spanish state's right over the land and persons of the Indies. A. Cuna Indians of the upper Rio Chucunaque and the San Blas Islands between Mulatupu and Cabo Tiburon B. Cuna Indians of the upper Rio Bayano C. Choc Indians of the regions west of Santa Fe, north and east of Yaviza, and along the Rio Sambti and its tributaries D. Negro and mestizo populations in the regions around Chiman.

    Archeology: Monte Alban's Hinterland, Part 1: The Prehispanic Settlement Patterns of the Central and Southern Parts of the Valley of Oaxaca, d E. Blanton, Stephen Kowalewski, Gary Feinman, and Jill Appel. Kenneth G. Hirth; Pages: First Published: March [There is a brief mention of Mission San Xavier del Bac on p. , and a photo of the church faces page A general discussion of Papagos is on pages ; the Papago village of Chuichu, population , is located nine miles south of Casa Grande (p. ); the Papago population of the Gila Bend Reservation is (p. ).].

    Taussig invokes previous work on the ‘mimetic faculty’ in light of an analysis of ethnographic material describing the cultural worldview and practices of the Cuna Indians of San Blas, Panama. The latter, he suggests, conceive of “two levels of reality, spiritual and substantial [ ] seen as distinct yet complementary” (). The study offered here deals with one indigenous people, the San Blas Kuna of Panama, and in particular with three closely related aspects of Kuna engagement with the outside world: with writing and literacy; with representations of indigenous character and culture; and, most of all, with anthropology and its own characteristic form of textual representation, ethnography.


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Brief review of selected aspects of the San Blas Cuna Indians by Aubrey E. Lippincott Download PDF EPUB FB2

A BRIEF REVIEW OF SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE SAN BLAS CUNA INDIANS Compiled by Aubrey E. Lippincott and Hartley F. Dame SORO/CINFAC/ SPECIAL OPERATIONS RESEARCH OFFICE The American University COUNTERINSURGENCY INFORMATION ANALYSIS CENTER Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.

Washington, D.C., 7 December I I. San Blas beaches and the semi autonomous state of the Cuna Indians. Getting there was quite an interesting drive in a 4x4 up and down the mountain (holding for dear life at every curve or ravine), then aboard high speed boats in very choppy waters (a wet ride for sure)/5(K).

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

A BRIEF REVIEW OF SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE SAN BLAS CUNA INDIANS. conditions among the San Blas Indians. In addition to the San Blas Cuna. Hello Select your address Molas, the appliqué stitchery folkcraft of the Cuna Indians of the San Blas Territory in Panama, have become familiar objects in recent years.

This richly illustrated book, with 31 color plates and over black-and-white illustrations, describes their remote island dwellings located at the edge of the jungle 4/5(2). Many have long appreciated the intricate Mola art of the San Blas Cuna Indians. Colorful and intricate, it is admired and sought after.

This book now introduces a wider audience to another segment of Panamanian art: beautiful and exquisitely designed baskets. A BRIEF REVIEW OF SELECTED ASPECTS OF THE SAN BLAS CUNA INDIANS This brief study is intended to provide a picture of the culture of the San Blas Cuna Indians living in.

Get this from a library. Magnificent molas: the art of the Kuna Indians: Tule omegan weliwar itogedi = In homage to Kuna women. [Michel Perrin; Deke Dusinberre] -- "This book presents over masterpieces of textile art made and worn by women of the Kuna tribe living on coral isles off Panama's Atlantic coast.

Lively, varied, original and full of wit, molas. As Woolf and Grant () state, the variation in the population frequency of albinism is an intriguing problem, especially considering the low rate in Europe (1 in 17, in newborns, including all known forms, Martinez-Garcia and Montoliu, ) and the high rates reported for Central America (e.g., 1 in in the San Blas American Indians.

First published inthis collection of classic case studies in the ethnography of speaking had a formative influence on the field. No other volume has so successfully provided a broad, cross-cultural survey of the use, role, and function of language and speech in everyday life.

The essays deal with: traditional societies in Native North, Middle, and South America, Africa, and Oceania Reviews: 1. The pointed lip gesture is a facial gesture in use among the Cuna Indians of San Blas, Panama.

It occurs in various contexts with meanings which at first appear to be unrelated. An analysis of the contexts reveals, however, that the meaning ‘pointing’ is always present and that further meanings are derived from the discourse structures in.

Description: Journal of American Folklore, the quarterly journal of the American Folklore Society since the Society's founding inpublishes scholarly articles, essays, notes, and commentaries directed to a wide audience, as well as separate sections devoted to reviews of books, exhibitions and events, sound recordings, film and videotapes, and to obituaries.

Cuna Indians -- History. See also what's at your library, or elsewhere. Broader terms: Cuna Indians; Indians of Central America -- Panama -- History; History; Filed under: Cuna In. San Blas beaches and the semi autonomous state of the Cuna Indians.

Getting there was quite an interesting drive in a 4x4 up and down the mountain (holding for dear life at every curve or ravine), then aboard high speed boats in very choppy waters (a wet ride for sure). The islands (on the Caribbean side) are beautiful and unspoiledK TripAdvisor reviews. The home of several Native American peoples, such as the Guaymí, Kuna, and Chocó, Panama became the first Spanish colony on the ated as “the door to the seas and key to the universe,” it served in the s as the staging point for the Spanish conquest of the Inca empire, and until the 19th century it was a transshipment point for gold and silver destined for Spain.

Clyde E. Keeler spent five summers studying the Cuna Indians on the San Blas islands off the coast of Panama as part of his genetics research—specifically research into certain genetic traits of albino populations.

Published inthis book is. discusses "Cuna Household Types and the Domestic Cycle." This is a solid presentation of patterns and preferences for matrilocal residence among the Cuna, with data and rationale for variations in household organization.

In the final chapter, James Howe writes on "Communal Land Tenure and the Origin of Descent Groups among the San Blas Cuna.". Recent Research on Amerindian and Peasant Cultures in Yucatan and Central America Kent Mathewson and Michael Yoder Department of Geography Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA ABSTRACT At the two previous decadal meetings of CLAG, the Benchmark sessions on indigenous peoples and peasants in Latin America were organized topically.

truly exotic peoples. Such tourism is exemplified by travel to Panama to study the San Blas Indians or to India to observe the isolated hill tribes of Assam. Typical destination activities would include visiting native homes, attending dances and ceremonies, and possibly participating in religious rituals.

This book, by one of the leading scholars in linguistic anthropology, concerns the verbal art of the Kuna Indians of San Blas, Panama. The author describes a rich and varied array of Kuna verbal practices, ranging from reporting, formal speechmaking and political oratory to chants and magical communication with the spirit world.

This charming book is both an introduction to the Cuna Indians and their culture and a lavish catalogue of mola styles, including literally hundreds of. In the s and s, Keeler () undertook long-term studies on the Cuna Indian population of San Blas province. He reported on their high incidence of albinism, the possibility of selective inbreeding, the practice of infanticide, and the shortened life span of affected people (see Chapter 3 for further discussion of these studies).(Tule means "person" in the Kuna language.) The need to differentiate between the present-day San Blas Kuna and the agents in this book is more than a semantic distinction.

The early modern Indians of eastern Panamá and the present-day San Blas Kuna of .